Azure Application Proxy – Part 3

Setting up the Application in IIS

Assuming you have just installed IIS. Stop the default web application.

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Add a new website for our application.

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Specify a web site name – and select the path C:\www\intranet-app1 (the path we shared earlier in part 2).

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After clicking “OK” you will get a warning about port 80’s binding. This can be ignored as we have stopped the default web site that was using it.

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At this point if you try to access the application it will show an authentication error:

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We need to do some further setup to allow our chosen Authentication method. Enable kernel mode authentication on the Intranet-App1:

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Enable Windows Authentication

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Next Browse to the website – and you should be prompted to perform a domain login: (If you log straight in without being prompted, it may be because you are already logged into the domain, in that case start a private browsing session and retry.)

 

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You should now see the website page you created in Visual Studio

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Up to this point you have an application running on your Intranet, authenticating using your own Active Directory credentials.

In Part 4 we’ll enable Azure Application Proxy  to make this application securely available to external (Internet) users.

 

 

Azure Application Proxy – Part 2

To perform these steps, you’re going to need a domain joined Windows Server with IIS installed.

There are a few different ways to deploy a web application, perhaps the simplest is to deploy it using a file share.

Create a root folder for your IIS web site (C:\www) and within this root folder create and share a sub-folder for the intranet-app1 application we have just built:

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Map the share to ta network drive on the machine you’ve used for Visual Studio

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In the main Visual Studio window – select the Intranet-app1, right click and select Publish …

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In the Publish dialog box select the Custom option, enter a new custom profile name, click OK and then click Next

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Now select File System as the publish method and set the target location to the file share network drive location we set up previously. Click Publish

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If you now resize the Output window in Visual Studio you should see the web application deploying successfully.

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In Part 3 we’ll configure the IIS server to support our authentication choice.

 

Azure Application Proxy – Part 1

Part 1. Creating a simple application in Visual Studio

If you don’t already have Visual Studio you can download and install the community edition for free from here.

Start Visual Studio and create a simple web application:

When Visual Studio has started select  File -> New -> Project 

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Then select a ASP.NET Web Application, ensure Application Insights is not selected, enter a name for your project (“intranet-app1” in my case) and click OK.

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On the next screen select Web Forms unselect the Host in the Cloud button if it is selected and then click the Change Authentication button.

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In the Change Authentication dialog – select the Windows Authentication option and click OK

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Back on the select a template box click OK

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Next on the main Visual Studio workspace select Default.aspx from the Solution Explorer window on the right hand side. Right click and select View Designer

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In the main window for Default.aspx – click around ASP.NET and change the default text to something you will recognize.

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Finally Build (or Rebuild) the solution

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Now we’re ready to Publish this application which is covered in Part 2